Sans Everything #2

An International Conference about Sans Serif Letterforms History, Design, Use

Thursday 24 October 2019

Registration: esadtype@esad-amiens.fr


Venue
Ministère de la culture et de la communication
DRAC Hauts-de-France
Site d’Amiens
5 rue Henri Daussy
80000 Amiens


9h
Coffee & registration

9h30
Luciano Perondi
Mid-Adriatic Sans serif

10h30
Dan Reynolds
Should every foundry have its own sans serif?

11h30
Pierre Pané-Farré
PANORAMA
A reassesment of 19th century poster type

12h30
Lunch break

14h30
Morgane Pierson
Typographic representation of ancient writing systems: from research to type design

15h30
Sandrine Nugue
From Roubaix to Commercial

16h30
Hélène Marian
IMPROVISED SANS SERIFS
How intense experimental music listening can lead to sans-serifs typefaces design



9h
Coffee & registration


9h30
Luciano Perondi
Mid-Adriatic Sans serif

In this investigation on sans serif public lettering in Urbino and Rimini, Luciano Perondi will start by analysing the size, proportions and shape of the letters in the inscriptions of these two centers of the Italian Renaissance. He’ll formulate some hypothesis on the public function of writing in the project of the Renaissance city; how writing has been related to different modes of political participation and government.

Luciano Perondi has been involved professionally in type and information design since 1998. His main fields of interest are writing and reading process, the history of writing and its non-linear use (sinsemia). He is an associate professor at IUAV Venice, and a partner of the cooperatives CAST and ALPACA.


10h30
Dan Reynolds
Should every foundry have its own sans serif?

A history of German sans serifs should contain more than just names and dates of the first examples with lowercase letters, or designs offering a range of sizes, or even which foundries sold families of unified designs spanning across multiple weights and widths. Instead, a narrative of sans serif development might help us better understand changes within the type-founding business between 1850 and 1900. Looking at the sans serifs introduced during that interval, we can see how attitudes about originality and exclusivity came about. Don’t worry, though! This presentation won’t leave out those evolutionary milestones mentioned above.

Dan Reynolds works at LucasFonts in Berlin. He’s also a design historian focusing on foundries from Imperial Germany. In January, Dan passed his doctoral examinations in Braunschweig, where he taught for several years. Long ago, he worked for Linotype and freelanced for clients like FontFont, Indian Typefoundry, or Typejockeys.


11h30
Pierre Pané-Farré
PANORAMA
A reassesment of 19th century poster type

Investigating the diversification of letterforms from the 1830s onwards the talk will analyse the growing repertoire of display typefaces and typesetting practices of poster printers in the 19th century. Focus will be given to the German printing trade while also highlighting developments in France. Furthermore, the talk will examine German wood type manufacturers – a topic so far unexplored.

Pierre Pané-Farré is a typographic designer based in Leipzig and co-founder (with Stephan Müller and Reymund Schröder) of Forgotten Shapes. Next to his design practice, his work has been devoted to teaching (Burg Giebichtenstein, Halle), giving workshops and to historical research in the field of type design. He is currently preparing a Conspectus of German 19th century wood type manufacturers and researching (with Prof. Eric Kindel, University of Reading) on the emergence and development of the stencilled poster in France in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. [www.panefarre.com]


12h30
Lunch break


14h30
Morgane Pierson
Typographic representation of ancient writing systems: from research to type design

The earliest form of writing dates back to around 3300 BC. This was followed by the invention of many writing systems in the world (pictographic, ideographic, alphabetical…). As civilizations evolved, these writings systems have also been transformed under the influence of several factors such as trades, treaties, and conquests. Projects like PIM and The Missing Scripts demonstrate that the vast field of research in writing systems of the world requires exchange between various disciplines. In such initiatives, type design aims to preserve the minority and ancient scripts, as well as providing a tool to aid the study of human societies and cultures in addition to the history of writing.

Morgane Pierson is specialized in the development of ancient, minority, or not yet encoded writing systems. After joining The Missing Scripts project as researcher student at the Atelier national de recherche typographique (ANRT) in 2017, she designed the first typeface for Elymaic, an ancient writing system from Iran, newly in Unicode. She is currently developing a multi-script typeface for monetary inscriptions for the PIM project in collaboration with the Bibliothèque Nationale de France and ANRT.


15h30
Sandrine Nugue
From Roubaix to Commercial

Sandrine Nugue enjoys playing with signs and will demonstrate it through a presentation of Orientation, a typeface originally commissioned for the wayfinding system of a new student housing building in Roubaix. After an overview to her general approach, she will explain and focus on the process of its project: from initial constraints, to references, until its development with several weights and styles, for a final released by a foundry. And because type design is infinite, Orientation is still growing up.

Sandrine Nugue is an independent type & graphic designer based in Paris. She graduated from the post-graduate program of Ésad Amiens and then she divides her time between her type design and graphic design practice, and while also lecturing and teaching workshops in France and abroad. In 2015, she designed a free typeface family named Infini, the first public commission by The Centre National des Arts Plastiques.

16h30
Hélène Marian
IMPROVISED SANS SERIFS
How intense experimental music listening can lead to sans-serifs typefaces design

Louder, faster: sans serifs. Hélène Marian will focus on a turn at the beginning of her practice, that brought her from graphic to type design. Going through the hand lettered outsets of what will lead to PVC and WNBA typefaces, from freehand sans letterings drawn and redrawn on a daily basis, practiced as music scales and rudiments for DIY tapes and CD covers, to retail and custom typefaces.

Hélène Marian is a typographer, letterer and type designer practicing in Paris. Graduated from the Illustration DMA and from the Type Design DSAA at École Estienne, she now works for clients from French cultural institutions to American national sport league, and collaborates actively with members of the Parisian experimental music scene (artists, label, venue, magazine).
Along with her designer practice, she draws retail and custom typefaces inherited from her hand-lettering approach.
She also teaches lettering at Paris City Hall Graphic Arts School (Epsaa).